Thursday, 25 May 2017

2mm Franco-Prussian War Battle Report

The game in full swing!
Good afternooon everyone, and I hope wherever you're reading this it's in the shade.  The UK has broken out in an unprecedented spell of exceptional weather, with temperatures up into the low twenties for one brief period.

So I've been safely indoors wargaming away - and last night it was time for another 2mm game of Line of Battle.  This is a nice quick game for us to set up, as all the terrain and models are upstairs in Mike's attic.  The rules are available now, and remember, the next two people who buy the rules and write a review will get their money refunded as a thank you.

Anyway, this was a nice simple game set in the Franco-Prussian War, where the attacking Prussians had to seize and hold a bridge across a vital river.  We used Irregular Miniatures - the same ones as from our Supercampaign last year, The Bridge of Blood.



The deployment is shown above.  Nothing too complicated - it was very hot, so neither of us were in the mood for any subtle machinations.  A straight up fight - first one to die loses!



This shows the opening moves on the Prussian side of the river.  The French were being very static, content to shoot it out - I moved up some skirmishers and infantry towards the river to try and suppress the enemy while I crossed.



The skirmishing doesn't go very well.  The French rifles are much better than my old needle guns, so my infantry are repeatedly driven back.  The presence of cover on my side of the river helps to tip the odds in my favour as far as casualties are concerned, however.


The battle begins properly!  I move up my infantry columns in the centre, which take a tremendous pumelling at the hands of the French gunners.  My cavalry sneakily form up behind that wood...


Charge!  This was disappointing for the Prussians.  Normally skirmishers are easy to clear with cavalry - one successful round of combat and they automatically desperse.  Here, however, the long bridge means that I take some murderous volleys as I close the distance.  Mike's skirmishers only have to perform a moderate feat of chance-defying luck to win the combat and drive me back.


If at first you don't succeed - the firefights rage all along the river, as my sorely-tested infantry move up for another attempt...


A good example of the role of generals in Line of Battle.  Mike is using his Senior General as a simple, but effective, morale booster.  This keeps his skirmishers in the line.  I have my Divisional Commander perform Passage of Lines, allowing me to bring in fresh troops - but the artillery fire is so intense that my reserves are already battered when they come to the front!  Verdammt!


Meanwhile, this petty firing continued all through the game... it tied up my skirmishers very effcetively though.  They would have been useful elsewhere.


Here I prepare for a third attempt, but by now my infantry are all but exhausted.  Despite managing to drive back one French unit, they soon disintegrate and begin retreating back off the bridge.
 

End game, ninety minutes later.  You can see I came off the worse for casualties, and my army was also in a very poor state.  The 'shattered' units are marked with dashed edges, and are pretty much useless until they can be rested.

On the basis of this, we agreed that the French had won a crushing victory.  A well-fought game, and one that was very nasty - normally it's me who sits on the hill and defends, it wasn't nice charging into the arms of a well defended position!  But, it was a very enjoyable game.

Thanks everyone!

Saturday, 13 May 2017

Team Yankee Battle Report

Hello everyone, and after last week's preview of my Polish Army battalion for Team Yankee, I'm pleased to say we managed to get a great game in a few nights ago.  It was Mike's first game, so we put together a fairly standard attack scenario from the rulebook.  The Poles were defending three objectives on one side of the board, with a fourth on the Soviet edge.  The Soviets started rolling for reserves from Turn One, whereas I had to wait for Turn Three.
 

Tuesday, 9 May 2017

Polish People's Army in Team Yeakee

A few weeks ago I revealed that I'd been working on a Team Yankee campaign, using 2mm figures as campaign tokens.  Now I'm going to share some pictures of the 15mm Battlefront miniatures I've been working on over the last few weeks.

A new scale - and a new game

I've never really been into Flames of War - we did try it once, but found the rulebook very complicated.  Recently, I've found a new gaming pard'ner at work and he introduced me to Team Yankee.  I still don't know how it caught my imagination; the 1980s have never really interested me, even from an alternate history perspective.  But catch it did.

As one of wargaming's Big Beasts, like Games Workshop, Battlefront attract a fair amout of criticism and its popularity is by no means unanimous.  I won't wade into the debate, except to say that the newly-updated Team Yankee rules (which are very similar to the 4th Edition Flames of War rules) are very enjoyable, simple and realistic.  More details will follow in a future battle report.


Friday, 21 April 2017

Team Yankee: Homemade Air Power Counters

Afternoon everyone,

Time for (yet another) new project.  I have a habit of starting more things than I finish, but I've decided not to let it worry me unduly.  I not just paint what makes me happy, and if I 'finish' a project, then it's a bonus.

One of those is Team Yankee, the 15mm game from Battlefront Miniatures, much more well-known for their Flames of War series of games.  I'm a recent convert to the scale and time period, being much more interested in 1600 - 1914 and usually in smaller scales.  I was intimidated by the gargantuan size of the FoW rulebook, which brought back painful memories of tedious games of 40K's newer editions, which seemed to consist entirely of looking up obscure situations in rulebooks.

However, I was assured that all that had changed with the Team Yankee rules, which were a forerunner for the new 4th Edition of FoW.  Basically, things had been simplified and players are now provided with a series of snazzy laminated unit cards, which make dice rolling much easier.  I'm currently working on a Polish force - of which more in a future post.

But for today, I wanted to talk about the depiction of air power in games.  Team Yankee, like lots of other games, have players roll a 4+ to bring on air assets.  If they succeed, an expensive model plane is placed on the board, its shooting is resolved, then the model is removed.  Seems a bit pointless.

Motivated by a desire to make my Polish force as cheap as possible, I started toying with the idea of a 'strategic map', where off-table assets like air power (and artillery) can be represented using counters instead of on-table models.

So, with the help of Tumbling Dice's excellent range of Cold War-era aircraft, some 2mm armoured vehicles from Irregular, and an old Soviet map of Hamburg, we did it.

This is the 'board' - a sort of secondary game that's fought alongside the Team Yankee battle.  If ground attack planes can swoop down over whatever grid square the battle is being fought in, it can make an attack run on the board.

Thursday, 6 April 2017

Line of Battle: Rules for Large Battles 1600 - 1914

They're always closer than you think.
Today I unveil a project I've been working on for several years: Line of Battle.  This is a universal set of wargaming rules for large scale line battles between 1600 and 1914, and I'll be putting them up for sale from today.  Read on for details about the game, as well as how to get a free copy for yourself!

What is Line of Battle?

It's a set of rules for historical wargames that we have developed over the last three years.  The concept was inspired by other big-battle rules, like Warmaster and Give Them The Cold Steel, and it has been developed from a set of house rules and amendments to become a completely unique rules system.  Almost every 2mm or 6mm game you have seen on this blog since 2015 has probably been one iteration or another of Line of Battle.

What are the key features?

The game is designed to be moderately complex; a balance between playability and realism.  The key mechanics all fit on two sides of A4, and the rest of the rulebook is devoted to explanations, examples and other historical tidbits.

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Battle Report: The Civil Wars In Scotland

Yours truly, doing some experimental archeology...
Some of you may recall the 6mm American Civil War rules I wrote - detailed rules for regimental-level combat, with a focus on period battlefield tactics and drill.  We used these to refight every battle in which the 4th Texas fought. Well, I've now done the same for the British Civil Wars, using my 6mm Baccus figures.

Warre Without An Enemie is a tactical game where you command a body of pike and shot, supported by some cavalry and skirmishers.  You need to get all the different types of troops to work together effectively, in particular your musketeers and pikemen.  The rules revolve around morale and ground - casualties are almost an afterthought.  Your men will start to fragment long before they all die.

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Russo-Japanese War Supercampaign

Time for another of our Supercampaigns!  These are our in-depth, alternate history campaigns where members of our gaming group take the part of historical figures and refight old battles.  We've already done this for the British Civil Wars, American Civil War (twice), the Franco-Prussian War.  Most of this campaign took place last year, but I've only just got round to finishing the write-up.

Jane Dunn painted another beautiful picture, depicting a conference between the two Russian commanders and the umpire.

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Warmaster Three-Way Battle

Some of you might know that over the last year, I've really got into Warmaster - GW's 10mm Fantasy Game from many years ago, for those who don't know.  It's a really nice game, very simple to learn and play, and the models are fantastic.  Its simple mechanics have influenced my own game design, persuading me to strip out complex shooting rules from Two Splendid Lines and replacing them with simple, single dice rolls.

When I get the chance, I pop round to my friend Mike's house, and we play a game in his newly-renovated attic (almost all my games photos from the last year were taken in here).  The ability to have a dedicated space for gaming and terrain has revolutionised the way we play.  Now we've got storage, all the odds and ends of terrain and armies is now stored in a single place.  By pooling our resources, we're fortunate enough to be able to create some stunning battlefields.

Our gaming group, which began as a group of friends who all went to the same school, is now spread over quite a bit of the country but concentrated in Newark.  Whenever I can (all to rarely) I drop in for a game.  Recently, it's all been Warmaster.  I play with a rare army of Dwarves, Mike has some fantastically-painted Bretonnians, and Dan is the valiant Empire.  Here are a few flavour pics from our most recent game, where Dan triumphed over us both in a climactic three-way battle.

(As an aside, this is the first time I've ever bought a painted army second hand.  Although I don't feel as attached to these chaps, it was refreshing to be ready to play games straight away without a month of building, painting and basing).


Monday, 30 January 2017

A Tale of Two Armies - Basing a 2mm Force

Today we continue the Tale of Two Armies - an in-depth look at collecting a 2mm army.  We covered organising, basing and painting small-scale armies - now it's time to look at basing them.

In 2mm, basing is keyA nice base always brings a model together, but at this scale, the base is pretty much all you'll see on the tabletop.  Painting is just about giving the impression of a block of troops, but the base is what most people will actually be looking at.

The key is not to go overboard - a tree at 2mm might be 5mm tall, say, but you're not going to put a tree on every base.  I go for a generic green flock, with a scattering of fine gravel and sand to break it up a bit, then some foliage for bushes and small trees.  Anything more than that starts to look a bit over the top.

The War Room is ready.  Models are set out ready for basing, I have an area for scattering flock, with PVA on standby.  I find an old knife, a sculpting tool and even a few matchsticks are invaluable for spreading out the PVA.

Saturday, 21 January 2017

Diorama: The Death of Marshal Poulain

I've done a few small dioramas in my time, and recently I felt the need to paint some 28mm models again.  I'm taking a break from my 2mm posts to bring you this diorama which depicts the (fictional) death of Marshal Poulain at the Battle of Talavera.

Some of you might remember our recent Talavera game; it was an enormous undertaking, all done on 2mm scale.  I thought, however, I'd use my Christmas money to buy some lovely Perry Miniatures and recreate some crucial moments from the battle.  As with my previous dioramas, it's fairly small in scale, all mounted on a 120mm Secret Weapon Miniatures resin base.

The diorama shows the moment where Marshal Poulain, surrounded by Grenadiers of the 68th Ligne on one of the main crossroads in Talavera, is cut down when British Light Dragoons manage to flank the small force.  It was an absolute joy to spend lots of time on these - each model took about an hour to paint in total, spread over a day to allow for drying.  I know Perry Miniatures don't need me to plug them, but they are by far the finest 28mm miniatures out there.  Meticulously researched and stunningly sculpted, they made the whole painting process more enjoyable.

Next week we'll continue my posts on the 2mm Austrians with a basing tutorial, and you can look forward to a second Talavera diorama in the next month or so.